The Tocobaga vanished sometime after the 16th century.

Artist Theodore Morris produced vibrant paintings of the Tocobaga and other Florida tribes. For additional information, see www.losttribesflorida.com.

The Tocobaga vanished sometime after the 16th century. Nobody understands exactly when due to the fact that of a gap of 200 years in between visits from the Spanish. The reasons are also uncertain. They may have died from exposure to disease from the Europeans, eliminated in wars with surrounding tribes or combined with other tribes.

Feature photo: “Tocobaga Beach” by artist Theodore Morris. Tocabaga paintings used with consent of Theodore Morris, www.losttribes.florida.com.

To learn more about the Tocobaga, go to the Safety Harbor Museum & & Cultural Center, 329 Bayshore Blvd S, Safety Harbor, (727) 724-1562.

These Natives lived in small villages, each constructed around a central conference place location. Wood poles held up palm thatch roofs in their round homes.

Artist Theodore Morris, www.losttribesflorida.comThe Safety Harbor Museum displays artifacts and pictures of the tribe. Displays presently have examples of modern stone and shell tools and pottery from the Tocabaga.

The midden mounds that have actually been excavated had a wealth of details about what the people ate. The Tocobaga fished and collected shellfish as their primary source of food.

The Tocobaga had mounds in Safety Harbor and this location represents a few of the very best archaeological proof remaining today of Tocobaga culture. Finding out which people existed in prehistoric Florida is a continuous search archaeologists are trying to respond to even today. There were indigenous people in Florida prior to, throughout and after the Tocobaga.

According to the Spaniards that saw them, the Tocobaga were giants. The Tocobaga were well-muscled, strong and nimble because of a diet abundant in protein from the plentiful seafood and wildlife the location offered.

If you asked the typical person on the street what Native Americans originally resided in Clearwater, you d probably hear “Seminoles” or “Calusas.” Yet the locals who lived in Northern Pinellas and Western Pasco counties for over 500 years until the 16th century came from a Native American people called the Tocobaga.

The Tocobaga were well-muscled, nimble and strong because of a diet plan rich in protein from the plentiful seafood and wildlife the location offered.”Morning Hunt” by artist Theodore Morris, www.losttribesflorida.comOther mounds and excavations of towns expose tools the Tocobaga established for searching, cooking and eating. The Tocobaga had mounds in Safety Harbor and this location represents some of the finest archaeological evidence remaining today of Tocobaga culture. There were native people in Florida before, throughout and after the Tocobaga.

“Morning Hunt” by artist Theodore Morris, www.losttribesflorida.comOther mounds and excavations of villages expose tools the Tocobaga established for cooking, hunting and eating. For hunting, they employed a throwing stick with a spear called an atlatl. They also utilized a variety of tools such as hammers, adzes, drills, knives and scrapers, the majority of which were probably utilized for jobs such as digging, fabrication of shelter and food preparation. The people wore little clothes, but had numerous tattoos representing their status within the tribe.

The name Tocobaga indicates “the location of the gourds.” The word, spelled 5 different methods, initially appears in Spanish records in 1567 and in differing contexts might refer to a village, chief or individuals themselves.

“A New Day” by artist Theodore Morris, www.losttribesflorida.comNative American mounds served several purposes. A midden mound was generally a trash load of remaining shells and trash. A burial mound would consist of skeletons and weapons. A ceremonial mound was built high with a meeting point or chiefs house built on top.